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Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay quotes (18)

A man possessed of splendid talents which he often abused and of a sound judgment the admonitions of which he often neglected; a man who succeeded only in an inferior department of his art but who in that department succeeded pre-eminently.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Talent

Nothing is so useless as a general maxim.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Nothing

We see no reason for thinking that the opinions of the magistrate on speculative questions are more likely to be right than those of any other man. None of the modes by which a magistrate is appointed popular election the accident of the lot or the accident of birth affords as far as we can perceive much security for his being wiser than any of his neighbors. The chance of his being wiser than all his neighbors together is still smaller.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Judge

The knowledge of the theory of logic has no tendency whatever to make men good reasoners.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Logic

Free trade one of the greatest blessings which a government can confer on a people is in almost every country unpopular.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Trade

The measure of a mans real character is what he would do if he knew he would never be found out.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Character

Many politicians lay it down as a self-evident proposition that no people ought to be free till they are fit to use their freedom. The maxim is worthy of the fool in the old story who resolved not to go into the water till he had learned to swim.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Freedom

The essence of war is violence.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: War

The sweeter sound of womans praise.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Unsorted

From the poetry of Lord Byron they drew a system of ethics compounded of misanthropy and voluptuousnessa system in which the two great commandments were to hate your neighbour and to love your neighbours wife.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Commandments

By poetry we mean the art of employing words in such a manner as to produce an illusion on the imagination; the art of doing by means of words what the painter does by means of colors.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Poetry

It is possible to be below flattery as well as above it.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Flattery

Ye diners-out from whom we guard our spoons.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Guest

We know no spectacle so ridiculous as the British public in one of its periodic fits of morality.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Morality

The object of oratory is not truth but persuasion.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Persuasion

The conformation of his mind was such that whatever was little seemed to him great and whatever was great seemed to him little.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Exaggeration

Cunning is the natural and universal defense of the weak Against the violence of the strong.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Cunning

An acre in Middlesex is better than a principality in Utopia.
Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay   Category: Home